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Information for Faculty, SPS, Staff: Course Reserves

Important Note to Faculty and Instructors regarding Copyright, E-Reserves, and COVID-19

Copyright law has not changed. Fair Use is defined in Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. Please see what the law states: https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html

Because of the current extraordinary pandemic circumstances, the E-Reserves Unit of the library is willing to change the amount of a work that we will make available for your classes. However, only faculty and instructors can decide whether their use and amount of use would be considered fair: the library and the E-Reserves unit cannot make this determination.

We are asking faculty and instructors to understand their responsibility in making a Fair Use judgment. In addition, please also consider the amount being requested in terms of the current limited staffing at the library.
 

Course Reserves

Course reserves provide controlled access to limited portions of library-owned materials as well as personal copies that support classroom instruction.

  • Access to Reserves items may be provided electronically, through Blackboard, or in print.
  • Reserves materials include items that are essential to a course and may be in high demand.
  • Materials are placed on Reserves at the request of instructional faculty only.
  • Reserves can include books and book chapters, articles, exams, quizzes, class notes, CDs, DVDs, video recordings, and other materials.
  • Faculty may place personal copies of textbooks on reserve. Instructor's editions are allowed.
    • Faculty might try requesting a complimentary copy from the publisher; but take note that we are unable to place books on reserve that are printed with the phrase “For Review Only” or which contain language about similar copyright restrictions. See below for details on requesting a review or "desk" copy. 
  • Reserves are not intended to replace textbooks or course packs.

Request a Desk Copy

Almost all publishers are willing to send an instructor at least one free "Desk Copy"—and they are frequently willing to send more for a high enrollment class. There are a couple of things to keep in mind before you make the request:

  • You should use your university email address—the publisher may use this to ensure that you are, in fact, teaching faculty.
  • You can only request a required book; recommended items don't usually qualify.
  • You can only ask for a Desk Copy of a text after you have submitted the coming semester's book order to the campus bookstore—if you haven't submitted your book order for the term, you can ask for a "Review" or "Evaluation" Copy, but those will cost you money.

In order to request your Desk Copy, you will usually be instructed to either complete a form on the publisher's website or send a written request using Department/Institutional letterhead. The publisher will most likely ask you to supply some or all of the following information:

Instructor Name Instructor Phone Campus Mailing Address
College/University Email Position/Rank Name of Institution
Department Name Course Name Course Number
Section Number Expected Enrollment Semester/Term
Campus Bookstore Name Bookstore Contact Info ISBN/Title/Author Info

What is Course Reserves?

Reserves provides controlled access to limited portions of library-owned materials as well as personal copies that support classroom instruction. Access to Reserves items may be provided electronically, through Blackboard, or in print, at the library. Reserves materials include items that are essential to a course and may be in high demand. Materials are placed on Reserves at the request of instructional faculty only, and can include books and book chapters, articles, exams, media items, and other materials. Reserves donot replace textbooks.

Reserves policy is based on the United States Copyright Act of 1976. §107 of the Copyright Law specifies that it is a fair use to make a copy of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research.” This section further lays out the following four factors in order to determine whether the use of a work is fair use: (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.