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The following databases are newly acquired or being evaluated for a future subscription.
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African American Communities - offers a rich panorama of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of a handful of Black communities—Atlanta, Brooklyn, Chicago, and the North Carolina public education system. The focus is relentlessly local; there are frequent references to Black people organizing at the street and block level to improve their lives and overcome the harsh discipline of discrimination and second-class citizenship. The micro-level examination of communities is buttressed by an extremely broad array of primary materials and documents, including letters and correspondence, pamphlets, association records, newspaper and periodical clippings, judicial records, oral histories, visual materials, and ephemera. The contents of the database make it abundantly clear that although advances in overcoming racial barriers were exceptionally dilatory, African American citizens at the community level were highly diligent and resilient in forging a distinctive culture founded on self-determination.
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APA PsycTherapy - features 585 unscripted, authentic streaming video therapy sessions covering over 300 topics including anxiety, trauma, addiction and others.
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Duke University Press Ejournal Collection - provides online access to journals in the humanities and social sciences. The collection includes flagship publications, such as Hispanic American Historical Review and GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies. It also includes important new scholarship in cutting-edge fields, such as TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Public Culture, and the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies.
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Early English Books Online--Following its digital launch in 1998, Early English Books Online now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America, as well as works in English printed elsewhere between 1473 and 1700.

Beginning with the very first book published in English, EEBO draws from four authoritative bibliographical resources – both Pollard & Redgrave’s Short-Title Catalogue (1475-1640) and Wing’s Short-Title Catalogue (1641-1700) in their revised versions, as well as the Thomason Tracts (1640-1661) and the Early English Books Tract Supplement – to present more than 146,000 titles and over 17 million scanned pages of content.

Transcribed texts – TCP I and TCP II – are now included on EEBO, adding transcriptions to approximately 50% of the texts featured. EEBO also covers texts in more than 30 languages, ranging from Algonquin to Welsh, and incorporates variant editions and multiple copies.
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Early Modern Books Online—an extension of Early English Books (ProQuest) that spans the tumultuous years of the English Civil War, the Interregnum and the Restoration (1641-1700). While the purpose and features of this collection align with those of its predecessor, STC II contains further, more extensive lists of titles in subject areas such as the arts, the sciences, popular culture and women’s studies. An era that saw the rise of a mercantile class, the first English settlements in North America, and the development of secular philosophy and empirical science provides rich possibilities in research.

Students of the arts can access critical discourses on art and literature, such as Edward Filmer's Defense of Dramatick Poetry (1698), Pierre Monier's History of Painting (1699), and Henry Purcell's A Choice Collection of Lessons for the Harpsichord (1696).

For those interested in the history of science, the collection includes books by Newton, Boyle and Galileo, as well as popular scientific tracts such as Nicholas Culpeper's The English Physician (1652). Meanwhile, students of women's studies can find early editions of Aphra Behn, Anne Killigrew and Margaret Cavendish.

The scope and caliber of these two collections are without rival, providing as they do the materials for scholars in English literature, history, religion, arts, music, physical science, and women's studies the creative latitude required for important research opportunities.
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Royal Anthropological Institute, 1763-2016. History of Anthropology, Exploration and Social Sciences Across the Globe-- the world's longest-established scholarly association dedicated to the furtherance of anthropology (the study of humankind) in its broadest and most inclusive sense. The Institute is a non-profit-making registered charity and is entirely independent, with a Director and a small staff accountable to the Council, which in turn is elected annually from the Fellowship. It has a Royal Patron in the person of HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG, GCVO.
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Royal Geographical Society, 1478-1953. History of Geography, Colonization and Climate Science in the British Empire--founded in 1830. The learned Society promotes the advancement of geographical science in all its aspects. The Society’s archive contains vast collections of documents, maps, photographs, expedition reports, manuscript materials and books, and span 500 years of geography, travel and exploration. The RGS holds one of the largest private map collections in the world. It includes one million sheets of maps and charts, 3000 atlases, 40 globes (as gores or mounted on stands) and 1000 gazetteers. The earliest printed cartographic item dates back to 1485.
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Scopus uniquely combines a comprehensive, expertly curated abstract and citation database with enriched data and linked scholarly literature across a wide variety of disciplines. Scopus quickly finds relevant and authoritative research, identifies experts and provides access to reliable data, metrics and analytical tools. Be confident in progressing research, teaching or research direction and priorities — all from one database and with one subscription.
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